Understanding Affiliate Disclosures

Understanding Affiliate Disclosures

When you are in business online, in any way, your website is governed by a wide variety of laws. I know what it’s like to be in business online, and I love the online space. You can buy a site, get up a blog, a scheduler a stripe account and you are in business. When you dive into marketing you can run funnels and ads, but all of it is regulated. This post focuses on Truth In Advertising but there are a number of other regulations that apply to how businesses operate online. 

The problem with online business is that you can make a ton of money while not paying attention to all these regulations. But, the FTC gets salty fast. Today we are only talking about disclosing material relationships as they relate to Affiliates. But material relationships can also be an employer, a family relationship, or other beneficial relationships.

So let’s break down one of the best ways to start making money online FAST. Affiliates!  I love affiliate marketing! You can share things you love and get paid for it! Simple, amazing, fun. But the thing is like any marketing you have to DISCLOSE IT! Yes…you have to. Yes…even you….No it doesn’t matter how much you make if it’s only a discount, etc. I don’t want to hear it…disclose it, it’s the law.

When do you have to disclose an affiliate link?

Always…yup..always. It’s marketing and there is a financial relationship. If you are sharing on social like Instagram and Facebook you can use #affiliate or #ad to disclose the relationship. Some affiliate programs don’t allow you to share those links on Instagram or Facebook so you need to be sure you are abiding by the rules of the FTC, Facebook, Instagram, and the affiliate program you are sharing. It can seem like a lot but both Facebook, and Instagram make it really easy to disclose these things, and making sure the disclosure is in the first few lines ensures you don’t run afoul of the FTC requirements that disclosures are clear and conspicuous. Make them direct, placed in the body of your caption where it can be seen without expanding the text. Finally, don’t bury them in a long line of hashtags.

If you are sharing on your website, or in an email make sure that you are disclosing that the post/email has affiliate links in the post or at the end of the email. It can be as simple as “this post contains affiliate links”..  It can also be a bit cheeky or on-brand for you like “this post contains affiliate links which help support my coffee mug habit, but I only share things I love as much as my coffee”. You simply must disclose the material relationship. It’s my opinion that affiliate relationships are so common that you can use the very simple disclaimer without stating that you receive financial benefits, discounts, products etc. Just like with social media posts this disclosure must be at the top of the post, or within the text ‘above the fold’. For a blog post, this would be above where you have to typically scroll to see the rest of the text 

But my Privacy Policy or Terms of Use state that I use affiliate links?

Awesome. Either your Privacy Policy (which is also legally required and a lot of affiliate agreements require them too) or your Terms of Use (always a good idea to protect your content and site) should disclose your site’s policy towards affiliate links. But that doesn’t eliminate the requirement to disclose in a clear way in the content where the links are placed. 

Look, Nike says ‘just do it’… The badass lawyer for online businesses reminds you to ‘just disclose it’. Trust me on this one. Also, it’s not a professional look to fail to disclose. Your clients and business you may want to work with can tell if they hit an affiliate link and they will look to see if you had disclosed it. Trust me on this too, when I see entrepreneurs (some of your favorites and some big names) share something I think is an affiliate link I check the tracking code in the link…and if it’s not disclosed it changes how I choose to continue engaging with that person. 

If you read this and went…crap I don’t know if I have my legal in order. That’s ok. It needs to get done. Avoiding dealing with the legal in your business won’t make it better (and will generally make it more expensive). A perfect place to start is with your Website Terms and Privacy Policy!  It’s an easy way to get your content protected quickly! 

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Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Badass Lawyer for Online Business

Emily has been running business for 15 years and has ove 13 years of legal experience. She spent 10 years at the Los Angeles County District attorney's office where she truly learned to be a solopreneur. Emily has built her consulting and speaking business from the ground up, in her garage jamming out to 90's music. She specializes in no BS practical advice for the starting and scaling online entreprenur. Emily will tell you what the business gurus can't in a way that is both hillarious and empowering.

The CDC guidelines for school to reopen.

The CDC guidelines for school to reopen.

I am sure you have seen the Meme on Facebook at this point… You know the one, it’s blue and starts with “here we go New CDC Guidlines for reopening schools” (sic). Since it’s release and moment of viral fame it’s since been marked as ‘partially untrue’ by Facebook and fact-checked by multiple sources….including me.  I knew that Facebook was cracking down on information that may be untrue but this meme is the first time I saw that in action. I am including below both versions of the meme to show how Facebook is alerting individuals to the fact that something had been fact-checked and determined to be false or partially false. 

Either way, the CDC released its Guidelines for schools, and people immediately reduced them into this crazy meme. However, the guidelines are just that, they aren’t rules or mandates. “These considerations are meant to supplement—not replace—any state, local, territorial, or tribal health and safety laws, rules, and regulations with which schools must comply.” emphasis in original. CDC Considerations for Schools, May 19, 2020. 

CDC Risk Assessments 

I thought it was helpful that the guidelines broke activities down by level of risk, and gave suggestions for schools to make the best of what they can do. The Centers for Disease Control suggested that for schools to reopen they needed to consider Lowest risk, Moderate risk, High risk and describes them as follows:

Lowest Risk: Students and teachers engage in virtual-only classes, activities, and events.

More Risk: Small, in-person classes, activities, and events. Groups of students stay together and with the same teacher throughout/across school days and groups do not mix. Students remain at least 6 feet apart and do not share objects (e.g., hybrid virtual and in-person class structures, or staggered/rotated scheduling to accommodate smaller class sizes).

Highest Risk: Full sized, in-person classes, activities, and events. Students are not spaced apart, share classroom materials or supplies, and mix between classes and activities.

I appreciate that the CDC went on to break down different situations and considerations because with everything COVID these situations will be determined on the local and school district level. Schools in large metropolitan areas have different considerations than more rural schools, private and religious schools may be able to make different accommodations than large public schools.  The discussion of how schools should and will reopen needs to happen sooner rather than later. Without clarity on what will be happening in the Fall for schools makes it very hard for parents and employers to make plans for moving forward.

Why schools reopening is critical for parents

I have felt trapped in that holding pattern as well, not knowing when our daily rhythm will resume, creating a new rhythm without school and after school activities. Though I suspect when school does resume it will look different. Bake-sales for one will be a thing of the past for quite a while, are you slightly relieved like I am….is that terrible to say. Also stricter regulations for when students and teachers must stay home when sick. For most schools it’s already 24 hours fever free but I think we will see stricter enforcement of those rules, which is tremendously difficult for working parents. 

With that being said accommodating the new rhythm of school employers will have to also understand and accommodate parents taking care of sick children. If your home is anything like mine then it goes something like this…one child is sick, you take time to care for said child, they recover and resume school, the other child gets ill, you take time to take care of  said child…and then you get ill as well and go to work sick because you have already taken so much time taking care of your kids.  Every flu season this is our life. Early in my career as a District Attorney as my husband was building his business I regularly was the one who took time off and it was a challenge. Now that I work from home I find myself balancing child care and working from my laptop which is also a challenge. 

For more on this topic the last few episodes of my Get Legit Law and Sh!t podcast break down everything from the societal shift needed to help parents, the college admissions scandal and more of the CDC guidelines for reopening schools.

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Badass Lawyer for Online Business

Emily has been running business for 15 years and has ove 13 years of legal experience. She spent 10 years at the Los Angeles County District attorney's office where she truly learned to be a solopreneur. Emily has built her consulting and speaking business from the ground up, in her garage jamming out to 90's music. She specializes in no BS practical advice for the starting and scaling online entreprenur. Emily will tell you what the business gurus can't in a way that is both hillarious and empowering.

Paycheck Protection Program Loan Forgiveness.

Paycheck Protection Program Loan Forgiveness.

UPDATED

May 28, 2020

Congress passes modifications to PPP!!  The Senate still needs to pass and implement these changes but keep your eye on this as you are figuring out how to implement and use your PPP funds…this keeps changing.

NOTABLE CHANGES FROM THE PAYCHECK PROTECTION PROGRAM FLEXIBILITY ACT

RATIO  The 75/25 rule has been changed to a 60/40 ratio. Meaning 60% to payroll and 40% to other expenses. This will be a huge help. Remember the original law creating the PPP didn’t have the 75/25 rule the SBA created that as their rule interpreting and implementing the PPP).

TIMELINE The eight week period has been extended to a 24 week period. This eases the stress of business owners to allow them to use the money as they re-open rather than forcing them to spend it when reopening is still unsure.

Original Post

The SBA has finally released guidance and an application for Paycheck Protection Program loan forgiveness. This means PPP borrowers can now use the Loan Forgiveness application to structure how they spend their loan funds. The application provided will be submitted to the bank that lent you the PPP funds and not through the SBA. I imagine most lenders will create a digital version of this but having the ability to look at what’s required should help you start to plan how to use your PPP funds. 

Worth noting in the SBA guidance is that businesses can adjust the 8 week period to match their payroll schedule. So if funds are released to your business in the middle of a payroll cycle you can start the ‘alternative payroll covered period’ on your next payroll date. This will help businesses make sure that they are maximizing their use of the funds. 

A Note for Sole Proprietors, Partnerships and the Self-Employed

Sole Proprietors, Partnerships, and Self-Employed please make sure that you go through this application. The SBA has now made it clear that contributions to retirement funds or health insurance costs are not eligible for forgiveness under the PPP. Yes, if you were taxed as an S-Corp then you would be able to deduct these expenses but if you are not a formal business entity then you cannot. I don’t like it weather…but rules. 

Forgivable Payroll Expenses

The guidance from the SBA breaks down that Eligible Payroll Costs incurred during the 8 week period after the loan was funded, and for each employee must not exceed pay of $100,000 per year (less than $8,333.00 per month).  ‘Eligible Payroll Costs’ include:

“Compensation to employees (whose principal place of residence is in the United States) in the form of salary, wages, commissions, or similar compensation; cash tips or the equivalent (based on employer records of past tips or, in the absence of such records, a reasonable, good-faith employer estimate of such tips); payment for vacation, parental, family, medical, or sick leave; an allowance for separation or dismissal; payment for the provision of employee benefits consisting of group health care coverage, including insurance premiums, and retirement; payment of state and local taxes assessed on the compensation of employees; and for an independent contractor or sole proprietor, wages, commissions, income, or net earnings from self-employment, or similar compensation.” SBA Interim Final Rule 13 CFR Part 120

Forgivable Non-Payroll Expenses

Businesses may also have non-payroll expenses forgiven so long as those expenses are less than 25% of the total amount sought to be forgiven. If you want to have $100,000 forgiven then no more than $25,000 can be spent on the following non-payroll costs: 

(a) covered mortgage obligations: payments of interest (not including any prepayment or payment of principal) on any business mortgage obligation on real or personal property incurred before February 15, 2020 (“business mortgage interest payments”); 

(b) covered rent obligations: business rent or lease payments pursuant to lease agreements for real or personal property in force before February 15, 2020 (“business rent or lease payments”); and 

(c) covered utility payments: business payments for a service for the distribution of electricity, gas, water, transportation, telephone, or internet access for which service began before February 15, 2020 (“business utility payments”). SBA Loan Forgiveness Application 

The non-payroll costs being less than 25% of the total amount forgiven has been really frustrating to small businesses in high rent areas where rent can easily exceed payroll in normal times, and staying open requires…you know…paying rent!

How Should Business Owners Prepare

Use the application as a guide as you plan how to distribute your funds. If you are running monthly payroll talk to your CPA or payroll company about the ability to switch to bi-weekly payroll so you can maximize the 8-week period covered. There may not be any more government programs like this coming, so make sure you use this money in the way it serves to save your business. Forgiveness isn’t all or none, you can have some of the funds forgiven while others aren’t and that’s ok too. If its what will keep you in business legally use these funds in a way that makes the most sense for your business. 

Stay safe out there and if you want a more in-depth exploration of this topic and others check out the Get Legit Law & Shit podcast

 

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Badass Lawyer for Online Business

Emily has been running business for 15 years and has ove 13 years of legal experience. She spent 10 years at the Los Angeles County District attorney's office where she truly learned to be a solopreneur. Emily has built her consulting and speaking business from the ground up, in her garage jamming out to 90's music. She specializes in no BS practical advice for the starting and scaling online entreprenur. Emily will tell you what the business gurus can't in a way that is both hillarious and empowering.

Staying Safe Online During a Pandemic.

Staying Safe Online During a Pandemic.

From Zoom Bombing to security breaches with the SBA, the Coronavirus Pandemic has created the perfect environment for computer crime, identity theft, and general shenanigans. I mean everything is super weird right now, people are stressed and there are over 17 million Americans applying for unemployment benefits, this doesn’t even get into how many businesses are applying for SBA loans through either the PPP program or the EIDL.

Here is the thing when you have a whole bunch of people stressed and trying to navigate things they haven’t done before it’s the perfect opportunity for fraud, computer intrusion, and other forms of theft, identity theft, and bullshit like Zoom Bombing. It’s really hard to slow down and focus on protecting yourself during this time, but you also really don’t have the time to unwind identity theft right now either

SBA Data Breach

 When the SBA announced it’s security breach I wasn’t surprised. Overwhelmed systems are a great opportunity for hackers to take advantage of. Combine that with a workforce largely working remotely and aging government tech powering these systems and it’s almost too easily done. Then you have the fact that you know when people are going to be submitting their information, all their information….social security information, banking information, addresses, licenses…it’s everything you need to either sell profiles on the dark web or perpetrate identity theft. This is why the major credit agencies are allowing weekly credit checks for free through April 2021 and you should take them up on it. 

Zoom Bombing

It’s not all identity theft online these days. As most of us move online for work and school video conferences have become essential. Zoom, one of the most popular conferencing services publicly offered free options with extended capabilities to schools and school-age children. With that came, the quick overwhelm of the technology and zoom bombings of everything from classroom meetings to Congressional committee meetings.

Again, people are on zoom all damn day right now which makes it really easy to hit zoom rooms. The Zoom bombings generally involve foul language, racial slurs, and, of course, pornography. Not that pornography is new to Zoom…though against their terms of use, in-person sex clubs are also going online and taking the party to Zoom in the time of Covid as well….but that is for another post, and for Episode 31 of the Get Legit Law & Shit Podcast

What to Do

SO…what do you do to stay safe online right now? First, make sure the websites where you are entering data are the actual website you think they are. Expand the full site in the address bar so you know you are actually on the site. If you are trying to reach a government site it’s a .gov address. Second, Government agencies aren’t going to call you to ask for more information. They use the mail. Do not give that information over the phone. For that matter, no one is going to call and offer you money, help you get your stimulus check, or qualify for an SBA loan. Third, if you can use a VPN like Express VPN to try to keep your computer safe. Finally, be very careful with email attachments, it is one of the most common ways computers are infected with bots and backdoors. 

Stay safe out there and if you want a more in-depth exploration of this topic and others check out the Get Legit Law & Shit podcast

 

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Badass Lawyer for Online Business

Emily has been running business for 15 years and has ove 13 years of legal experience. She spent 10 years at the Los Angeles County District attorney's office where she truly learned to be a solopreneur. Emily has built her consulting and speaking business from the ground up, in her garage jamming out to 90's music. She specializes in no BS practical advice for the starting and scaling online entreprenur. Emily will tell you what the business gurus can't in a way that is both hillarious and empowering.

The War on How We Work

The War on How We Work

Opinion. Small business is under attack.

The situation in the world right now with the Coronavirus is going to fundamentally change the way we work and I see self-employment as being under attack.  Everyone should be able to work the way they want. Be it as a gig worker, independent contractor, service provider, employee, business owner….whatever it is!  If we can make money doing it (and it is not illegal) then you should have the freedom to choose what you do to make money and how you do it. 

The Coronavirus public health crisis is bringing to light the way we work and integrate our work and our life.  Work has become our primary identity, especially as people are choosing to step away from communities like a church community or a hobby community, a bowling league….people just aren’t as involved in activities outside of work as they used to be.  We often don’t have a community outside of work, and therefore work becomes our community and our identity, and that can be a very dangerous thing, especially when it’s suddenly taken away.

My TEDx talk “The Three Words That Will Change Your Life”, addresses what happens when our identities get wrapped up in work and how hard it is to break that cycle. Kinda like a bad relationship cycle where It’s like, “But it fills me up and when it’s great, it’s so good, but when it’s bad, it’s so bad and I don’t know how to get out of it”.  Then when your finances, healthcare, retirement plans, and social group are all tied up in that it can be really hard to leave. The choice to be self-employed is a hard one, but it’s getting harder…which is crazy to me because Americans are so driven by the identity of being an individual. Americans won’t be told to eat healthy, stay home, not own guns, practice a specific religion or lifestyle or being told they can’t. Americans want to do what we want in our own way. So it’s no surprise that self-employment is so popular, yet it’s not being well supported during this crisis. What I am seeing during this time is that most of us feel like we are failing, at everything, all the time. Right now it’s really hard to be a full-time parent, full-time employee/boss/business owner, full-time spouse, and still process the trauma of what we are going through during this pandemic. 

When you add to that the fact that it’s getting harder for gig workers and contractors to find work independently with States like California categorizing most workers as employees, it’s even harder for those out of work right now to simply pick up digital gigs while they are ordered home by the government. Trying to find work on something like Upwork, Fiverr or Rev is near impossible if you have an address in California due to AB5. Not be able to pick up gig work that you can do on the internet is ridiculous to me right now. States are pushing contractors to rely on unemployment rather than their own ability to work.  Then when you finally get into Government help for small businesses, the self-employed, independent contractors businesses aren’t being treated the same.

The Self-Employed weren’t even able to apply for the Paycheck Protection Program until a week this program rolled out to formal corporations and businesses.  30% of the nation’s workforce were self-employed as of 2019. The self-employed accounted for 44 million jobs. That’s a lot of jobs created by the self-employed. It’s estimated that there are over 16-million people who are self-employed, Solopreneurs who pay themselves on a draw and not on a W-2 paycheck.  Yet, this sector is still being treated like second class businesses because they generally don’t have existing borrowing relationships with banks, don’t have lawyers on call for help and don’t also have accountants or CPAs to help navigate these programs. 

It’s estimated right now as the self-employed and solos are able to apply for things like the paycheck protection program apply for things like an economic injury that there are over 26 million Solopreneurs who pay themselves on a draw and not a W2 yet. That sector, that sector, that accounts for 44 million jobs was not allowed to apply for the paycheck protection program until a week after other companies had been allowed to apply.

There is still this secondary treatment of the self-employed through even getting aid during coronavirus. The cares act allows self-employed individuals and in that, I’m lumping in, you know, sole proprietorships, independent contractors, gig workers, all, all y’all self-employed are being treated less than and less valuable than traditional companies that pay W2’s are being treated as if they aren’t as important, but this is 30% of the workforce. This is a big deal, but when the cares act rolled out, unemployment for self-employed, most States still don’t have that up and running. When they rolled out the paycheck protection program, including self-employed businesses, they couldn’t apply until a week later and then can’t always apply at their bank. If they don’t have a lending relationship. A lot of people who are self-employed try not to take on business debt. That’s their choice to work the way they want to work and to make their work and their life look different.

I keep seeing attacks on small business in news stories, on social media, and in conversations. Businesses should be prepared, people should be prepared with savings and a disaster plan. Did anyone (well I am sure some did, but it wasn’t the dominant conversation) have these discussions with the banking industry in 2008 when they needed a bailout for a situation they created?? This pandemic caused government forced closures of non-essential business, unlike anything we have lived through. This is unanticipated and for some business ending and it wasn’t caused by the industry themselves.

I am frustrated, I am with you and I don’t know how to make it better at the moment. If you need to save your business do it, apply for the PPP, if it doesn’t fit the EIDL might. If that doesn’t then unemployment. You didn’t cause this, this is an unprecedented event and it’s ok to be in survival mode. Don’t let anyone, or anything makes you feel like your business isn’t worth saving.  You’ve got this, hang in their friend. If you want to hear my full rant on this…it’s in Episode 29 of Get Legit Law & Sh!t. 

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Badass Lawyer for Online Business

Emily has been running business for 15 years and has ove 13 years of legal experience. She spent 10 years at the Los Angeles County District attorney's office where she truly learned to be a solopreneur. Emily has built her consulting and speaking business from the ground up, in her garage jamming out to 90's music. She specializes in no BS practical advice for the starting and scaling online entreprenur. Emily will tell you what the business gurus can't in a way that is both hillarious and empowering.

The Paycheck Protection Program Explained.

The Paycheck Protection Program Explained.

I will continue to update the Guide that covers the PPP as information changes. If you want to stay up to date — get the guide.

Updated 4-4-2020

What you need to know about the Paycheck Protection Program.

First. If you are considering a Paycheck Protection Program SBA Loan this is the information you need now. If your bank does not yet have an application live for you you can use the SBA Application to gather the necessary information and read the fine print. If your business bank is accepting applications I will break down the information you need on hand to apply…then go do that….today!

What is the program for?

To allow businesses to maintain employees on payroll and continue to cover expenses such as mortgage interest, rent, utilities and of course payroll and employee benefits.  

How long does this program run?

You can apply through June 30, 2020, or ‘until funds made available for this purpose are exhausted’ – SBA interim final rule.  Currently, there are 349 Billion set aside for the PPP program. If you need these funds apply early, and honestly.

Who can apply?

Businesses with under 500 employees, though there are some exceptions if you are a restaurant and have under 500 employees at a particular location and a few other exceptions…if that could be your business go call your attorney and parse this out. My information is directed at small businesses, the self-employed, contractors and online-business owners.

  • Businesses with under 500 employees who are US-based employees. (S-Corps, C-Corps and LLC’s as well as 501(c)(3)’s)
  • Sole Proprietors, Independent Contractors, Self-Employed (though some banks are requiring these individuals to wait to apply until 4/10).
    • You must submit documentation to establish eligibility ie. payroll processor records, payroll tax filings, 1099s or income and expenses from a sole proprietorship.
      • IF you do not have that the lender may use bank records to demonstrate the qualifying payroll amount.

NOTE you must have been in legit business operation as of 2-15-2020 and had employees who you paid salaries and payroll taxes for OR paid independent contractors, as reported on a form 1099.

Can you apply for more than one PPP Loan?

No. Each eligible borrower may only apply for one loan. This is part of the rule from the SBA and is not broken down in the CARES Act.

Are any businesses not eligible?

YES

  1. activity considered illegal under federal, state or local law. So legally operating marijuana dispensaries, are still illegal under federal law, gambling, sex work and the like.
  2. If you are a household that employees household help (nannies, housekeepers and the like).
  3. Businesses who have defaulted on SBA loans in the last 7 years
  4. If an owner of 20% of the business or more is incarcerated, on probation has been convicted of a felony and a few other provisions.

What circumstances qualify?

If your business isn’t struggling just yet what does that mean? You are required to verify that “the current economic uncertainty makes this lan request necessary to support the ongoing operations of the applicant.” SBA Application 

Is this a loan or a grant or what?

This is a loan program. The current fixed rate of the loan is 1%…however, funds used for the intended purposes “documented payroll costs, covered mortgage interest payments, covered rent payments, and covered utilities, and not more than 25% of the forgiven amount may be used for non-payroll costs”, any amounts falling outside that are a loan which a 2-year repayment at 1%.

What amount of this loan can be forgiven?

Up to 100% of the loan plus incurred interest so long as the forgiveness provisions are met. Including not reducing employee compensation levels, not using more than 25% of the loan for non-payroll expenses.

How do I apply?

Through your business bank, if your business bank is not an authorized SBA lender there are some loan aggregation services facilitating this loan. You do not apply through SBA.gov.

How much money can my business get?

The loan amount is the lesser of either the average monthly payroll costs for the previous 12 months multiplied by 2.5 or 10 million. There is a 10 million cap per business.

The SBA recommends the following

  1. Aggregate all payroll costs
    1. PAYROLL IS – compensation for US employees in the form of salary, wages, commissions, cash tips, etc, benefits including vacation, parental, family, medical or sick leave, employee benefits consisting of health care, insurance premiums and retirement compensation, and payment of state and local taxes assessed on employee compensation
    2. FOR INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS, SOLE PROPRIETORS AND INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS PAYROLL IS: wage earnings, commissions, income or net earnings from self-employment. 
    3. What is excluded from payroll costs
      1. Employees outside of the US
      2. Compensation to any one employee over 100K a year
      3. Sick & Family leave which is credited under FFCRA (see my guide to FFCRA for info on that)
  2. Subtract any compensation to a single employee in excess of 100K a year
  3. Calculate the average monthly costs (divide the above amount by 12)
  4. Multiply the average monthly costs by 2.5
  5. Add any outstanding amount from an EIDL loan made between January 31, 2020, and April 3, 2020, less the amount of any ‘advance’ under the EIDL COVID-19 loan (Generally 10K)

Can you apply for more than one PPP loan?

The SBA states that only no eligible borrower may receive more than one PPP loan.

Can I use the PPP to pay Independent Contractors?

NO- Independent contractors have the ability to apply for a PPP loan on their own, therefore they do not count to be paid by a business under the PPP loan. 

When do I have to pay this back? 

There should not be payments required for the first 6 months, but during that time interest will accrue. Then it is a 2-year loan. 

How are they determining who gets loans and when?

The funds are first come, first served until they run out…may the odds be ever in your favor on this one.

How does this work with Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDL)?

If you are using an EIDL loan to cover payroll it will need to be refinanced into a PPP loan and the application will ask about that. If you received a $10K advance through EIDL you do not need to refinance it and it will not be counted against your PPP loan. 

What is the deal with this 10K advance?

Under the EIDL loan business can request a 10K advance that may be used for

  1. Payroll costs
  2. Making rent or mortgage payments
  3. Repaying obligations that cannot be met as a result of losses in revenue
  4. Meeting increased costs to obtain materials

This is applied for through SBA.gov

 

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Badass Lawyer for Online Business

Emily has been running business for 15 years and has ove 13 years of legal experience. She spent 10 years at the Los Angeles County District attorney's office where she truly learned to be a solopreneur. Emily has built her consulting and speaking business from the ground up, in her garage jamming out to 90's music. She specializes in no BS practical advice for the starting and scaling online entreprenur. Emily will tell you what the business gurus can't in a way that is both hillarious and empowering.

Coronavirus, Business Interruptions and You

Coronavirus, Business Interruptions and You

You can’t get away from conversations about Corona Virus or as it’s formally called Covid-19, normally those conversations also quickly turn to ‘but why the toilet paper, does Corona Virus cause the shits? I thought it was the flu?’  I know you have had these conversations, I have had them too, either in the Get Legit Facebook Community…or in the moments I am out and about in my community. 

In episode 23 of the Get Legit Law & Sh!t podcast, I cover more than just toilet paper shortages and fear. Because there are real impacts of a global event like this that you need to prepare for if you own your own business, if you are employed 9-5 or if you are just preparing to deal with school closures for your kids.

So let’s talk about what is happening to business impacted by Corona Virus and what my suggestions are. Also…because I am a lawyer I must disclaim things, I am not a medical professional, just an opinionated lawyer who worked as an EMT once for the experience but couldn’t stand the smells. I am sharing what I have taken from the professionals, what I see happening around me and my own decisions. Note number 1…carry your own pen so if you are out and about you don’t have to touch community pens! 

My Kids Response

One of the most interesting things for me is watching my kids respond to everything. My oldest and I were at Target (I love LOVE Target), and he was amazed at the empty shelves…shelf after shelf empty, no toilet paper, no bleach, no Clorox wipes, no paper towels, no hand sanitizer and like 4 hand soaps (well I bought one and so there were only 3, but I didn’t get all hoarder about it!). He was shocked that so much was gone. I could see on his face that he was processing what it means that so much was gone. I wasn’t surprised. I have lived through earthquakes, and riots and I know that people get nervous. 

Latest and Greatest

Since I recorded Episode 23 a few things have changed. First Coachella and Stage Coach were postponed until October.  Over 12 states have declared a State of Emergency, including California. Boston canceled it’s famous St. Patricks Day parade, the first time since 1994 when it was canceled among political issues. In addition to all of that, there are now 55 Universities that have canceled in-person classes. 

The 2020 Olympics

The one thing I am most curious about is if the 2020 Summer Games in Tokyo will be canceled. They will no doubt be impacted.  A member of the Japan organizing committee stated that if the games can’t be this year they would rather postpone 1-2 years. Japan is a significantly impacted country, more so than most and only less impacted than China, Iran, South Korea, and China. But it sucks for the athletes who have been preparing for these games. A lot can change in 1-2 years for an elite athlete and it breaks my heart for the 2020 hopefuls. Even though it hasn’t been announced I am going to go ahead and guess that if the games aren’t canceled (which I think they will be), they won’t have any spectators for sure. But how much does that cost Tokyo? Reports in December 2019 indicate that Tokyo spent over 12 BILLION on the Olympics. I am sure the expected revenue for Tokyo is from ticket sales, sure, but the amount of tourism that would come into the city in 2020 and beyond would be beyond what they have spent. So I can only imagine that Tokyo would rather postpone the games than have them held without the wallets…I mean spectators. I will call it now, I think the games will be postponed.

Impacted Supplies

From iPhones to Diet Coke there will be impacted supply lines. I expect to see iPhone supplies constrained when we get to (if we get to?) the new iPhone launch expected in September 2020. The iPhones are manufactured in Shenzhen China and if parts are components aren’t being built now because of factory shutdowns there won’t be enough parts to put together new phones. The same applies to Diet Coke which relies on sucralose supplies also from China. Though Coke was talking about supply chain constraint I can imagine that other Diet Sodas will be impacted. 

Booming Business

Though there are some business prepping for constrained supply lines, and I am sure really questioning their reliance on China as a sole supplier, there are other companies that are booming. Clorox, anyone who makes hand sanitizer, Netflix (cause what are you going to do if you are isolated at home), and Campbells Soup….cause that shit lasts forever. I mean consumer demand for Hand Sanitizer is up 1,400 % from December to January. That only presents the problem of manufacturing enough! In an unstable economic environment like this having an in-demand business isn’t a bad thing at all. 

Emily’s Tips

Look, the CDC and the World Health Organization are keeping people up to date. That is the best place to get information. Next is your county health officials, if there is an outbreak in your area that you need to know about that’s where you need to know. Both organizations recommend the same thing, wash your hands, stay home if you are sick….like stay home until you are all the way well. They have let us know that coronavirus is 400 times more contagious than the flu and you can actually be more contagious when you are symptomatic (unlike the flu where you are generally less contagious.) 

If you need to be out in public take hand sanitizer or wash your hands, wash your hands when you get home from being in public. My number one for his…bring your own pen when you are out cause touching communal pens to sign things is ick. Same for a stylus to sign at the store use a pen or a fingernail if you can! Those things don’t get cleaned!

Financial Tips From Not a Financial Advisor

Look we are getting into some economic uncertainty…it’s not the time to sell off stocks or investments in a panic, they will go back up. Make the best decisions you can with a long term perspective. Look at how markets have recovered from other global events and do your best. It’s a great time to evaluate your budget and save if you are in an impacted industry. Travel, hospitality, restaurants all expect to be significantly impacted. If you work in an impacted industry save money incase your job shifts or you have hours cut. I will also plug having a side hustle, but right now UBER may not be the best bet. So if you have the opportunity to create an online side hustle, reach out to me and let me know. I love the online world and there is so much opportunity to make money there. 

We are all going to get through this together and if you want to chat about this or anything, the Get Legit Community on Facebook is a space curated by me so that we can have these conversations without judgment, or crazy social media BS. You know I’ve got you. 

 

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Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Badass Lawyer for Online Business

Emily has been running business for 15 years and has ove 13 years of legal experience. She spent 10 years at the Los Angeles County District attorney's office where she truly learned to be a solopreneur. Emily has built her consulting and speaking business from the ground up, in her garage jamming out to 90's music. She specializes in no BS practical advice for the starting and scaling online entreprenur. Emily will tell you what the business gurus can't in a way that is both hillarious and empowering.

Taylor Swift, Sexual Assault & Miss Americana

Taylor Swift, Sexual Assault & Miss Americana

Why Miss Americana Matters

I wouldn’t consider myself a Taylor Swift fan, however, Miss Americana is a must-watch in my book. In Miss Americana  Taylor Swift goes from candidly talking about body image and seeking external validation to her sexual assault case. Taylor shares an unrestricted look into her experiences without veiling her emotions behind lyrics, and I am here for all of it.

Taylor highlights both the plight of staying relevant while not being taken seriously as both an artist and a businesswoman, as well as the blaming and shaming that happens to women when they report sexual assault.  With over 10 years as a Deputy District Attorney, I worked with more victims of crime than I can count. Victims of sexually violent crimes and fraud crimes suffered a different type of shame than victims of violent crimes. They often blame themselves, wondering if they should have done something different, or should have prevented what happened in some way. Often there is also a feeling of shock that the thing even happened.  In both fraud crimes and sexual assault, the perpetrator is the one who made the decision to cross that line, it is not the victim’s fault. 

From Harvey Weinstein to Taylor Swift

Taylor Swift talking about her experience highlights how prevalent negativity towards victims is. The Harvey Weinstein trial highlights how much backlash victims can face.  In an interview with The Daily Podcast, one of Harvey Weinstein’s Attorneys  Donna Rotunn was asked if she had ever been a victim of sexual assault and she stated “I have not because I would never put myself in that position,” she said. “I’ve always made choices from college-age on where I never drank too much. I never went home with someone that I didn’t know. I just never put myself in any vulnerable circumstances ever.” This attitude that women somehow ‘put themselves’ in the position to be assaulted is horse shit.

The Taylor Swift Assault

Taylor Swift was assaulted while she was at work. In 2013 she was at a meet and greet before a concert when a Radio DJ waiting to take a picture with her, in her words, grabbed a handful of ass.  She immediately told her security team, the radio station was informed and the DJ lost his job two days after the ass grab incident. It seems that Taylor Swift seemed to keep this incident quiet and out of the media. Then in 2015, the radio DJ sued Taylor Swift for Defamation requesting 3 Million in damages, Taylor countersued for the assault for a symbolic dollar.  

The trial wrapped up in 2017 with the Judge dismissing the defamation case, because it was bullshit, and the jury found in favor of Taylor Swift with regard to the assault. In Miss Americana Taylor talks about how it felt to be believed, and how in an incident with multiple witnesses and a photograph when it happened Taylor wondered out loud what happens to women who are raped or assaulted in private when it’s just their word against their attacker. She isn’t wrong…it is hard for victims to preserver through the criminal justice system. 
What I appreciate about Swift is how open she was in interviews after the trial about the process and how she pulled back the curtain on her experience in Miss Americana. During the trial the DJ  testified that the experience following this accusation of the assault was “humiliating” for him and that  “it cost me my career, the thing I love to do, my passion”. Here is what I love, Swift wasn’t having it and said, “I’m being blamed for the unfortunate events of his life that are a product of his decisions, not mine.” I hope that every person who has ever been made to feel small, to feel shame, to blame themselves for someone else decisions find strength in those words. 

If you want to hear more on the Taylor Swift Sexual Assault trial and Miss American be sure to catch Episode 19 of the Get Legit Law & Sh!t podcast

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Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Badass Lawyer for Online Business

Emily has been running business for 15 years and has ove 13 years of legal experience. She spent 10 years at the Los Angeles County District attorney's office where she truly learned to be a solopreneur. Emily has built her consulting and speaking business from the ground up, in her garage jamming out to 90's music. She specializes in no BS practical advice for the starting and scaling online entreprenur. Emily will tell you what the business gurus can't in a way that is both hillarious and empowering.

UBER Strikes Back

UBER Strikes Back

You have heard me talk a lot about AB5 from how it screws over content creators to the fact that freelancers have gotten laid off in droves. The so-called ‘UBER’ law has resulted in UBER responding in a multitude of ways.  So if you are wondering how AB5 affects UBER, if UBER is complying with AB5 or even if UBER prices will go up because of AB5 you are in the right place.

AB5 in a Nutshell

By way of review… AB5 is a new law in California that changes the way Independent Contractors are classified. The reason that California rushed AB5 through its legislature was as a response to a Supreme Court decision that implemented the ‘ABC’ test for independent contractors. Under the ABC test you determine if someone is an Independent Contractor by evaluating;

  1. The person is free from the control and direction of the hiring entity in connection with the performance of the work, both under the contract for the performance of the work and in fact
  2. The person performs work that is outside the usual course of the hiring entity’s business.
  3. The person is customarily engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, or business of the same nature as that involved in the work performed.

So What Is UBER Doing?

Since the passing of AB5 in September (it went into effect January 1, 2020), UBER has had several arguments and responses to the law. First, UBER argued that AB5 didn’t apply to them. The argument was that because UBER doesn’t identify itself as a ridesharing company, they argue that they are a software company, so, therefore, drivers are ‘outside of the usual course of the hiring entity’s business.’ 

 Next, UBER, LYFT, and DOORDASH decided to attempt to exempt themselves from AB5 by investing in a 90 Million dollar ballot initiative to have the voters decide if there should be exemptions for this type of Gig worker.  If you aren’t familiar with California’s ballot initiative system, in a nutshell, anyone with enough votes can get an initiative on the ballot and it will then become law if passed. If that goes to the voters in November we will see what happens.  But, in an abundance of caution UBER and POSTMATES filed a lawsuit against the State of California and the State Attorney General arguing AB5 is unconstitutional based on a number of factors.  

But What About The Changes UBER is Making In California???

I am assuming that UBER is hedging its bets on if they will actually win the lawsuits or end up on the ballot because they have changed their business model to give the drivers more autonomy. The changes that are rolling out in California are that  Drivers can set their own prices. So rather than relying on the UBER algorithm Drivers can lower their pricing or raise it up to five times the ‘suggested’ or algorithm rate.  

In addition, drivers can now see the destination of the trip before accepting and are given the ability to reject trips without penalty, which is a factor considered with regard to contractors and agencies. While UBER is attempting to make sure that the drivers don’t have to be converted to employees they have created another problem, it’s a problem for consumers as pricing will be going up. 

The attempt to comply with California’s AB5 has caused an additional issue for UBER. Drivers across the country are arguing that if Drivers in California are allowed to set their own rates then all Drivers should be allowed to set their own rates. The ability to set your own rate is a factor in all independent contractor tests, and the Driver’s have a good argument that California drivers shouldn’t be treated differently from Drive3rs across the US. 

If you want to hear more about UBER striking back against AB5 I discuss it in Episode 18 of the Get Legit Law & Sh!t podcast

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Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Badass Lawyer for Online Business

Emily has been running business for 15 years and has ove 13 years of legal experience. She spent 10 years at the Los Angeles County District attorney's office where she truly learned to be a solopreneur. Emily has built her consulting and speaking business from the ground up, in her garage jamming out to 90's music. She specializes in no BS practical advice for the starting and scaling online entreprenur. Emily will tell you what the business gurus can't in a way that is both hillarious and empowering.

Sued Over Yelp Reviews

Sued Over Yelp Reviews

You can get sued over bad yelp reviews.

If you don’t know this is a thing, let’s talk about getting sued over negative reviews. We aren’t talking reviews like in the Sunday Riley FTC settlements, where the company was leaving fake positive reviews for themselves. Here we are dealing with consumers getting sued for leaving negative reviews on sites like Yelp, Trip Advisor and others. This has become such an issue that the Federal Trade Commission stepped in.

Getting Sued for a Negative Yelp Review


Tom Loyd is a Flordia man who was sued by the Deland Animal Hospital for leaving a negative Yelp review.  Mr. Loyd told news sources that his dog suddenly fell ill and he rushed him to the Animal Hospital for a ruptured spleen requiring emergency surgery.  He was told the surgery would be done immediately. However, six hours later the Hospital called and told him to pick up his dog because they were unable to find a surgeon. When he got his dog to the next clinic they told him that it had been too long since the rupture and that the dog would need to be put down.

Tom left the following review on Yelp according to an article on CBS News “The staff had wasted six hours of Rembrandt’s life and destroyed whatever chance he may have had to live. Our Rembrandt deserved a better last day.” Look, I don’t disagree with Tom. His review isn’t slanderous, it isn’t even particularly mean. But that didn’t matter to the Deland Animal Hospital, who sued Tom over the review.

How can you sue over a bad review? 

In the realm of defamation, there are laws that protect against interfering with business relationships, and against malicious and false statements among other things. In Tom’s case, the Hospital argued that the review was false and malicious. Tom told CBS News that he was over 26,000 in debt fighting the lawsuit.

How is the FTC involved?

Companies attempted to protect themselves from negative reviews by putting clauses in their service agreements, and in the case of hotels, their rental agreements, to prevent individuals from publishing negative reviews. In response to the attempted contractural silencing of customers, the FTC passed the  Consumer Review Fairness Act. According to the FTC the Consumer Review Fairness Act “protects a broad variety of honest consumer assessments, including online reviews, social media posts, uploaded photos, videos, etc. And it doesn’t just cover product reviews. It also applies to consumer evaluations of a company’s customer service.”  To do that the act prohibits businesses from putting it in their contract that negative reviews can’t be left, or imposes a penalty or fee for someone who leaves a negative review or requires people to give up their intellectual property rights in the content of their reviews.

What can consumers do?

In an article, I was interviewed by The Points Guy.com for I suggested that consumers keep their reviews honest, dispassionate, and factual. Additionally, attempt to deal directly with an establishment if you have had a negative experience before turning to the internet to vent. I also support a good vent, type it, don’t publish it. At the end of the day relying on the adage “, the truth is an absolute defense”, can still land you tens of thousands if not hundreds of thousands in legal fees, even if you haven’t done anything wrong.  Keep yourself in the best position to not get sued by keeping reviews honest and factual.

For more about this topic the Get Legit Law and Sh!t episode 17 covers this topic.

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Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Badass Lawyer for Online Business

Emily has been running business for 15 years and has ove 13 years of legal experience. She spent 10 years at the Los Angeles County District attorney's office where she truly learned to be a solopreneur. Emily has built her consulting and speaking business from the ground up, in her garage jamming out to 90's music. She specializes in no BS practical advice for the starting and scaling online entreprenur. Emily will tell you what the business gurus can't in a way that is both hillarious and empowering.

California’s Freelance Apocalypse has begun.

California’s Freelance Apocalypse has begun.

California begins the Freelance Apocalypse

You have likely heard of California’s AB5 by now. You know the new law that has changed the test for who qualifies as an independent contractor making an estimated 1 million freelancers employees as of January 1, 2020, according to an International Business Times article. Most assume that this law was ushered through the California legislature with little through for the fallout. Which, seems to be the case, but it was the law of the land before the bill was signed due to a California Supreme Court decision in the Dynamax case.

That decision changed the law, the rather rushed bill just applied further parameters, fines for lack of compliance, more bureaucracy and carved out exceptions for some (lawyer, doctors, realtors, HR professionals), and left many others wondering what the fu$k they are supposed to do now (fitness trainers, truckers, pilates instructors, musicians, photographers, a large majority of writers). 

I work with online business owners varying from service providers to the course and content creators to straight-up creatives. All of these businesses thrive and survive on collaborative work with independent contractors. Most of my clients are moms who opted for more freedom for their family and took to the internet to carve out a living. Now, these same businesses that allow women to make choices about their child care and children’s schooling are facing either an increased workload, increased overhead or potentially the closing of their business. 

I have been fielding calls for weeks from freelancers and business owners alike asking the same question ‘what do I do now’. Out of state businesses are choosing to cut ties with California freelancers. Businesses within California are also ending their relationships with freelancers, requiring them to either apply for positions as employees (where they will get paid less and lose a lot of the tax benefits of running your own business), or their contracts are just ended.

The thing that hasn’t been considered is how much this hurts freelancers who love working that way. As a freelancer you set your own hours, take on work as you choose to, experience the tax benefits that come with owning your own business and own your intellectual property (if your contract is written well by an awesome lawyer like me). As an employee, your intellectual property belongs to your employer. A consequence that obviously wasn’t considered by the legislature. 

The termination of contracts for hundreds of Vox Media freelancers this week is the beginning of a landslide for freelancers in California. I have one question for you guys…..where are we moving??

If you need more information on AB5 and how it may affect you and your business I have other resources on the topic.

RESOURCES

Get Legit Law & Sh!t Podcast covering the topics

Blog Article “AB5 and YouTube Creators”

The Independent Contractor Guide is coming soon and you can sign up for it below. 

If you have a community that needs this information I am here to help. Shoot me an email to hello@emilydbaker.com. I am happy to talk to your community, podcast, or channel about how to Get Legit™.

Grab the Independent Contractor Guide!

Check out this FREE guide to help you figure out Independent Contractor Rules & AB5, Enter your email and then choose if you would also like to also join my email squad. Cause I would love to keep you informed about the changing online laws.

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Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Badass Lawyer for Online Business

Emily has been running business for 15 years and has ove 13 years of legal experience. She spent 10 years at the Los Angeles County District attorney's office where she truly learned to be a solopreneur. Emily has built her consulting and speaking business from the ground up, in her garage jamming out to 90's music. She specializes in no BS practical advice for the starting and scaling online entreprenur. Emily will tell you what the business gurus can't in a way that is both hillarious and empowering.

Questions for Emily? Just Ask...

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What Content Creators Must Know about COPPA.

What Content Creators Must Know about COPPA.

If you are feeling stressed and confused about YouTube, COPPA, Content Creation and the FTC you are not alone. The recent and historic fine levied on YouTube and parent company Google by the FTC is a clear indicator to content creators on all platforms that winter change is coming. I have gotten quite a few questions about this because I am a lawyer and a content creator..so let’s talk about it a bit more.

What can content creators do?

First, the fact that you are paying attention is a huge plus. You are taking action to make sure that your content isn’t going to create problems for you. If you are on a non-monetized platform, pay attention to the rules regarding collecting or encouraging the collection of information. If you are on YouTube then you are aware that you need to start indicating if your content is made for children and understand what content could be considered to have an ‘intended audience’ of children under 13. 

Is your content ‘child-oriented’?

The FTC published a Six-Step Compliance Guide in 2013. Despite this YouTube asked the FTC for further clarification last week. This is likely because YouTube is getting screamed at by content creators who have no idea how to comply and YouTube is doing its best to pass all the responsibility for compliance along to creators. This despite the fact that the FTC listed how YouTube must comply, and the fact that COPPA was enacted into law before YouTube even existed and they have blatantly ignored it for over 13 years…but I digress…

‘Child Oriented’ or whether the ‘Intended Audience’ is under 13 is determined by the FTC by evaluating the following factors. 

  1. The subject matter
  2. Visual content
  3. Use of animated characters or child-oriented activities & incentives
  4. The kind of music or other audio content
  5. Age of models
  6. Presence of child celebrities or celebrities who appeal to children
  7. Language or other characteristics of the site
  8. Whether advertising that promotes or appears on the site is directed to children &
  9. Competent and reliable empirical evidence about the age of the audience 

If you are thinking that this could be literally anything and this isn’t helpful at all, you aren’t alone. With regard to the content, you create remember that COPPA doesn’t forbid content created for children under the age of 13. It prohibits certain tracking behaviors. So if you make content that falls under one of these prongs as a YouTube creator first you need to make sure to indicate it on the YouTube platform itself.

Next, you need to be aware of what you shouldn’t be doing.

What does COPPA prohibit?

“ You cannot collect information online regarding children (any under 13) through means like passive tracking, requesting, prompting, or encouraging them to submit personal information or enabling a child to make personal information available in an identifiable form” FTC.gov. This is where YouTube got into the shit. YouTube was tracking viewers of ‘children-oriented’ content and serve ads based on tracking behavior. 

If children under the age of 13 are being tracked by cookies like Google Adsense or Facebook pixel then the operator of the website MUST have VERIFIABLE PARENTAL CONSENT. Yuuuppp. This is what YouTube was lacking. However, I think the FTC is really clear that the WEBSITE OPERATOR is the one responsible, that would be YouTube. 

This prohibition on collecting information extends to usernames and screen names. Yes, that means asking viewers to comment is problematic. The first step is understanding your content and making sure it’s clear who it’s intended for. The second step is understanding what you can and can’t do.

What can creators do to protect themselves?

While I think YouTube will continue to try to pass the responsibility to creators it is ultimately YouTube who has the power to stop tracking. What this likely means for creators whose content can be considered child-oriented is that their ad revenue will go down, they will see monetization turned off on some content, they will see comments potentially disabled on some content. We know that engagement drives how videos show up in search and how they are suggested by YouTube so videos will likely be suggested less. Creators need to be ready to ride this out while YouTube figures out how and if they will continue to serve ads on child-oriented content. 

One of the most important things in all of this is that Creators make sure they don’t encourage information to be shared, that means not asking for comments or for engagement that requires a screen name or username to be shared. That they do not host giveaways where there is no age verification to ensure minors under 13 don’t enter. The onus is on YouTube but creators will get thrown under the bus in a second. So be smart, stay informed (you can always follow me on social cause I am not going to stop talking about this anytime soon @theemilydbaker… shameless plug over) and talk to other creators in your space. 

I also have two podcast episodes on this topic, or you can find Get Legit Law & Sh!t in your favorite podcast player.

If you have any questions hit the contact form below, I am here to help.

If you have a community that needs this information I am here to help. Shoot me an email to hello@emilydbaker.com. I am happy to talk to your community, podcast, or channel about how to Get Legit™.

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Emily D. Baker, Esq.

Badass Lawyer for Online Business

Emily has been running business for 15 years and has ove 13 years of legal experience. She spent 10 years at the Los Angeles County District attorney's office where she truly learned to be a solopreneur. Emily has built her consulting and speaking business from the ground up, in her garage jamming out to 90's music. She specializes in no BS practical advice for the starting and scaling online entreprenur. Emily will tell you what the business gurus can't in a way that is both hillarious and empowering.

Questions for Emily? Just Ask...

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